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A rain cloud passes by….

A rain cloud passes by….

Pembroke tobacco in my churchwarden pipe.

Pembroke tobacco in my churchwarden pipe.

My leather-bound meerschaum pipe from Tanzania.  Smoking some Balkan tobacco.

My leather-bound meerschaum pipe from Tanzania. Smoking some Balkan tobacco.

Morning supplies, at work, programming. Tobacco is “Battlefield” by Just for Him.

Morning supplies, at work, programming. Tobacco is “Battlefield” by Just for Him.

Ready for a heavy programming session…

Ready for a heavy programming session…

Magnitude M1.5 Solar X-ray Flare July 7, 2014 (22:34 UTC peak

Peaking at 22:34 UTC on 7 July, 2014, the Sun erupted with a magnitude M1.5 x-ray flare from NOAA Active Sunspot Region 12106.  It caused a shortwave radio blackout over the sunlit part of the Earth.  This video captures a spectacular show of a massively huge “plume” of plasma rushing away from the region.

Credit:  NASA / SDO

Please subscribe.  Share.  Comment.  Thank you!

— Tomas / amateur radio NW7US

http://NW7US.us

More solar info at http://SunSpotWatch.com

Want to learn about space weather and radio propagation?

Are you interested in learning about the Sun, space weather, and radio propagation?

Are you interested in learning about the Sun, space weather, and radio propagation? Website: http://nw7us.us/swc

If you are interested in learning these topics, including topics of sunspots, solar flares, coronal mass ejections, as well as topics on the ionosphere, the magnetosphere, and how radio waves propagate from transmitter to receiver then you may want to take this self-paced course.

We are offering a time-proven “course” that you can self-study, so that you can become well-versed in this information. Proceeds of this course go toward the operation, maintenance, and equipment funds for http://SunSpotWatch.com/ and related resources and websites like http://swl.hfradio.org/ or http://cw.hfradio.org/ - so by taking this course, you are gaining a lot of space weather and radio propagation knowledge, and also helping our community by helping us continue to provide these free resources.

Here’s the order page: http://nw7us.us/swc

Normally, the course is USD $200. With the ray-tracing PropLab PRO software, it is normally bundled for $275. Effective now, though, we’re offering it to you on sale. The course itself is $100, while the bundle is $175.

Some amateur radio operators may say, “But, I like the magic of just getting on the air and trying my luck! If I learn all this stuff, then it becomes science, and not a hobby.” It is true that there’s a joy at being dazzled with the magic of radio; buy a super cool transceiver, and a factory-made antenna with coax already fitted with connectors, adding the necessary accessories to make it come alive, then begin exploring the shortwave frequencies. Magical, indeed! But, there are many in the hobby that wish to learn how all of that works. Some even begin learning how to build antennas, radio kits, and discover the joy of the “science” of radio. A few eventually take the step with gained “scientific” knowledge of electronics, and they design and build equipment for their hobby. The course is part of that mix: learning how the Sun affects getting a radio signal from point A to point B, and how to leverage their time and efforts, is a joy, indeed.

A list of the topics covered in this home-study course include:

+ The Sun
+ Basics of the Sun
+ Sunspots
+ Types of Sunspots
+ Sunspot Magnetic Fields
+ Solar Radiation and Radio Emissions
+ Solar Cycles
+ Techniques for Modelling Solar Cycles
+ Sources of Information and Imagery
+ Interplanetary Space
+ The Solar Wind
+ Magnetic Fields
+ Heliospheric Current Sheet
+ Solar Sector Structures
+ The Earth
+ Magnetosphere
+ The quiet magnetosphere
+ The disturbed magnetosphere
+ Understanding Magnetic Indices
+ Magnetic Storms
+ Sudden Storm Commencements (SSCs)
+ Gradual Storm Commencements
+ Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GICs)
+ Effects on Electrical Hydro Systems
+ Effects on Other Long Conductors
+ Ionosphere
+ Formation of Ionospheric Layers
+ Factors Affecting Ionospheric Layers
+ Solar Disturbances
+ Transient Solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs)
+ Types and Structures of Coronal Mass Ejections
+ Understanding the Importance of CME Structures
+ Inferring CME Structures from Available Solar Data
+ Coronal Mass Ejection Detection Methods
+ Using IMPACT (software) to Aid in CME Disturbance Predictions
+ Solar Cycle Dependencies
+ Solar Flares
+ Basic Nature of Flares
+ Types of Flares
+ Flare Rating Systems
+ Significance of Proton Flares
+ Ground Level Events (GLEs)
+ Fast Transit Events
+ Interpreting Magnetograms
+ Determining Magnetic Shear and Flare Susceptibility
+ Solar Flare (and Proton Flare) Prediction Techniques
+ Solar Flare Related Coronal Mass Ejection Prediction Techniques
+ Sources of Solar Flare Information
+ Solar Coronal Holes
+ Coronal Hole Basics
+ Recurrence
+ Solar Cycle Correlations
+ Associations with Near-Relativistic Electrons
+ Coronal Hole Related Disturbance Prediction Techniques
+ Filament Eruptions
+ Filaments and Prominences
+ Eruptive and Non-Eruptive Activity
+ Filament-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections
+ Filament-Related Disturbance Prediction Techniques
+ Auroral Activity
+ Basic Theory of the Northern/Southern Lights
+ Behavioral Characteristics of the Auroral Ovals
+ Sensitivity to Solar Disturbances
+ Affects on Satellite Health and Radio Communications
+ Mathematical Models of the Auroral Zones
+ Auroral Activity Prediction Techniques
+ Information Sources
+ Conditions Affecting Satellite Health
+ Atmospheric Drag
+ Surface Charging Anomalies
+ Deep Dialectric Charging Anomalies
+ Interplanetary Shocks
+ Magnetopause Crossings
+ Postulated Sun/Earth Climate Connections
+ Possible Long-Term Climatic Trends
+ Rainfall
+ Temperatures
+ Atmospheric Pressure
+ Storm Tracks
+ Ozone Correlations
+ Possible Short-Term Meteorological Trends
+ Pressure and Winds
+ Lightning
+ Storm Systems
+ Ozone Responses
+ Radio Propagation
+ Basic Theory (Non-Technical)
+ Characteristics and Components of Radio Signals
+ Understanding Plasmas
+ Importance of Electron Collisions
+ Appleton/Hartree Contributions
+ Signal Polarization and Coupling
+ Ionospheric Absorption
+ Deviative Absorption
+ Non-Deviative Absorption
+ Fading
+ Multipathing
+ Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances
+ Solar Related Disturbances
+ Structure of the Ionosphere
+ Ionospheric Layers
+ Importance of Sporadic-E
+ Effects of Spread-F
+ Solar-Cycle Dependencies
+ Models of the Ionosphere
+ Simple Mathematical Models
+ Numerical Maps
+ and MUCH MUCH more

The STD SW Course (created by Cary Oler, STD) presents you with some specific historic real-life scenarios. Using the information and techniques studied in this course, you are asked to develop your own space-weather and radio-propagation predictions. The actual real-life impacts are then studied and compared with your forecasts.

The Course presents you with several hypothetical (possible future) examples and ask you to develop your own forecasts.

Here’s the order page: http://nw7us.us/swc

Jul 8

 On July 8, 2014, the Sun erupted with an M6.5-class x-ray flare.  The approximate flare maximum was at 1621 UTC, at a flux of M 6.5, resulting in a radio blackout on the sunlit-side of Earth.  The blackout was moderately strong, at R2 on the NOAA scale.

his video is capturing the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) at the 304 and 94 angstrom wavelength.

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA.

Please subscribe, comment, and share!

Space weather on Facebook: https://Facebook.com/spacewx.hfradio

Space weather website: http://SunSpotWatch.com

Best regards,

Tomas / amateur radio, NW7US

Twitter: https://twitter.com/NW7US
http://NW7US.us

Jul 8

Amazing sweeping arches and loops of magnetic field on the Sun, this week.

Two active regions with their intense magnetic fields produced towering arches and spiraling coils of solar loops above them from June 29 through July 1, 2014, as these sunspot regions rotated into view. 

When viewed in extreme ultraviolet light (EUV), the magnetic field lines are revealed by charged particles that travel along them. We cannot see extreme ultraviolet with our eyes, so we convert the EUV into artificially-colored yellow. In this video, these active sunspot regions appear as dark sunspots when viewed in filtered light. 

Note the small blast in the upper of the two major active regions, followed by more coils of loops as the region reorganizes itself.

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA.

Please subscribe, comment, and share!

Space weather on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/spacewx.hfradio

Space weather website: http://SunSpotWatch.com/

Best regards,

Tomas / amateur radio, NW7US
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NW7US
http://NW7US.us/

Check it out: ‘Ham Radio Now' episode, with the topic of space weather and radio propagation; I'm the guest.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph94GAOJeUQ